Category Archives: Type 1 Diabetes

Type 1 Diabetes

I Can

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When I was around 18 years old, I went to the gynocologist for a regular check-up. My doctor stressed to me how important birth control was, not because I was young, unmarried, in college, etc..but because I was Type 1 Diabetic. She told me that women with Type 1 cannot have healthy babies. She said it wasn’t an option. She said being pregnant would cause immense strain on my diabetic body..I wouldn’t be healthy and neither would my baby.

I went on to have two healthy, beautiful children. Sure, it took a lot of work on my part. I was lucky to have a great high-risk ob who worked well with my endocrinologist. But, I often think of myself as being “lucky” to have had two children. I’ve thought that if I ever had a third child, I would really be “pushing my luck”. All because of what one doctor said, one time to me, years ago. Looking back, could she have just been capitalizing on my disease in order to try to keep me from having an unwanted pregnancy? I guess so. But what she said stuck with me.

Women with Type 1 Diabetes have healthy babies all the time (maybe even right this second!) and I am one of them!

   
 

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Rheumatoid Arthritis Type 1 Diabetes

Vicious Cycle

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Type 1 Diabetes and Rheumatoid Arthritis are enemies battling within my body.  I took my methotrexate injection last night. As expected, today has been rough. Here’s what I’ve accomplished:

  • Slept last night for 10 hours
  • Kids brought me eggs in bed which surprisingly tasted great (because I’m nauseous, not because of their cooking!) and then I took a shower
  • I sat down on my bed, in my robe, and woke up an hour later
  • Got dressed (sweats of course) and went to the store for a few things
  • Came back, slept for another 4 hours
  • I’m trying to stay awake for two hours and maybe have something to eat before going to sleep for the night

My blood sugars don’t like this exhaused state that I’m in. I can’t exercise and have barely moved around. I have 1,855 steps for the day right now and if you follow me on Twitter, you know that’s a really low number for me! Because I haven’t moved or eaten, my blood sugars are high. Common sense would say that if you haven’t eaten, your blood sugar would be low, right? Nope. 

Other days, I have the opposite problem. Having a busy day at work and/or exercising keeps my blood sugars in optimal range. BUT, all of that movement pisses off my Rheumatoid Arthritis and I have a ton of pain during the week. Some of my pain medications tend to raise my blood sugar (in my opinion, the stronger the pain med, the stronger the chance my blood sugar will go up after taking it). If your blood sugar is too high, exercise is a bad idea! 

Oh to have just one of these autoimmune diseases…I’d pick Type 1 Diabetes over Rheumatoid Arthritis every time. How about you?

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Rheumatoid Arthritis Type 1 Diabetes

Needles

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I have never, in the past 26 years, been so happy to be a Type 1 Diabetic. Earlier today I picked up my injectable methotrexate. I told the pharmacist that I needed syringes and she asked what type. I told her that I hadn’t injected insulin in 15 years but something short and super sharp would be great. She packed up twelve syringes for me and I left. 

Just a few minutes ago, I went to inject methotrexate for the first time (I used it in pill form awhile ago). When I took the cap off the syringe, I couldn’t believe how long the needle was! I figured I was just out of the whole syringe game and went to inject. The needle was so dull and thick that my scar tissued leg wouldn’t let it even pierce my skin. I tried twice. Nothing. 

I sat on my bed, frustrated, and then realized that I’m a Type 1 Diabetic, a neurotic one at that, and always prepared. Of course I have extra syringes, there’s even one in my purse! I searched through the closet and found a few. I quickly drew up the methotrexate and injected- first try, no pain, no issues! 

My syringe on the left, the “super sharp and short one”, given to me by my pharmacist, on the right. 

  

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Type 1 Diabetes

It isn’t the end of the world..

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I used up my last Enlite sensor last week. Due to an error in Minimed’s system, my order from weeks ago had been caught in limbo until tonight. (My order just shipped, huzzah!) Was I super annoyed with Minimed? Yes. Did I spend hours on the phone with them? Yes. Did I die without having CGM enabled? No. Not even close.

I truly thought the past few days would be horrendous. I considered not going to work, staying home to monitor my blood sugar behind closed doors. I seemed to have quickly forgotten that I spent the first 22 years or so of my Type 1 life relying on a blood glucose machine and the pricks of my fingers. I forgot that I used to go hours without a single finger stick. I relied on my long acting insulin and, more importantly, how I felt.

Over these past few days, I had a few nighttime lows- in the 60s, yet I woke up on my own and not to the sound of a screeching alarm. For the most part, every time I checked my blood sugar it was pretty much on point.

As convenient as an insulin pump and CGM are, I really need to stop relying on them. I need to be able to go an hour and not be constantly looking at my screen to see which way my arrows are going. I need to make a more conscious decision to not correct every little blood sugar because that usually results in a reading which is higher or lower than necessary. I need to realize that I am Molly not Molly, the Type 1 diabetic. I’m working on it 🙂

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Daily Prompts Type 1 Diabetes

Helpless

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I’m playing catch up! The Daily Prompt for January 7: Helpless

Helplessness: that dull, sick feeling of not being the one at the reins. When did you last feel like that- and what did you do about it?

I feel this way every day..I just wouldn’t call it helpless. As anyone who has had Type 1 Diabetes for quite some time (25 years for me) knows, you can do the exact same things 2 days in a row and have completely different blood sugars each day. Sometimes your blood sugar is low, no matter how many glucose tabs you eat, and how little insulin you take. I’m sure there’s an explanation- hormones, weather, who knows..but it happens. Every day, my little mechanical pancreas helps me hold the reins for the hopefully-not-so-bumpy day that lies ahead.

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Daily Prompts Type 1 Diabetes

Kick It

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I’m playing catch up! The Daily Prompt for January 3: Kick It

What’s the 11th item on your bucket list?

I don’t have a bucket list..maybe I should, maybe I shouldn’t. But, while thinking about this post, I’ve come up with one item. I’d like to take a trip, by myself. Not because I want to get away from my family but because I want to prove to myself that I can do it. I’m extremely independent, I can’t stand depending on others (I’m working on it), but a trip on my own sounds a little scary. I’d like to force myself to go away, even just for a weekend, somewhere that I’d have to use air transportation to get to.

Since I’m a Type 1 Diabetic and have to travel with all of my medications and devices, flying makes me anxious. I hate being patted down in front of everyone and having the TSA act like I’ve somehow made a bomb look like a juice box. I always feel “safer” when someone else travels with me. For some reason having to slam a bottle of apple juice because I’m low isn’t as awkward if someone is with me. When I get finished with my pat down, someone is waiting on the other side of the line to joke with me or help me get my things together.

The thought of sitting alone in a restaurant for dinner, sounds awfully intimidating. Do I need to work on not caring about others judging me? Should I work on being comfortable while alone in public? Definitely. I think a trip is in order.

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Type 1 Diabetes

Obligatory Venting Post

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Yesterday at work, I was speaking to a parent on the phone. The parent mentioned that his child was pre-diabetic and then proceeded to say “I’m sure you don’t know much about that”…hmm. I immediately told him that I was actually quite familiar with diabetes as I have had Type 1 diabetes for 25 years. His response floored me:

“Wait. You actually work?” Yes.
“Full time?” Yes. “You went to college too?” Yes.
“So you have diabetes and a job?” Yes.
“Wow. That’s not normal. I guess there’s hope.” Uhh..

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