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Category Archives: Diabetes Blog Week

Diabetes Blog Week Type 1 Diabetes

The Healthcare Experience

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Most people who live with a chronic illness end up with a lot of experience when it comes to dealing with healthcare. How would you improve or change your healthcare experience? What would you like to see happening during medical visits with your healthcare team? How about when dealing with your health insurance companies? What’s your Healthcare Wish List or Biggest Frustration? Today is the day to share it all!


Having multiple chronic diseases does involve a lot of doctors appointments. There are some overall healthcare items I’d like to change:

  • Communication. Especially between providers. And, especially, before my visit. It would be great if my endocrinologist read my rheumatologist’s visit note before my appointment. She would see that maybe I was having a rough month and that prednisone was on the horizon.
  • Fluidity. If I ask my endocrinologist about my trouble sleeping, she gives me some ideas but ultimately says that that issue falls under my PCP. Totally understandable. But maybe she could take the extra step to send a message to my PCP, letting her know that I needed some help. Save me a doctor’s visit and a copay.
  • Timing. My diseases aren’t just being managed from 9 to 5, Monday through Friday. Recently, my insulin pump decided to stop working. At 11pm on a Thursday night. My endocrinologist and Medtronic were easy to get in touch with but my insurance company? Nope. My endocrinologist called in a Lantus Rx, to my 24hr pharmacy, but it was delayed because my insurance initially rejected the claim. It wasn’t resolved until the next morning. Just because I wasn’t in the ER, doesn’t make my need for insulin any less important.
Diabetes Blog Week Rheumatoid Arthritis Type 1 Diabetes

Call me Diabetic but don’t call me Arthritic

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There is an old saying that states “Sticks and stones may break my bones, but words will never hurt me”. I’m willing to bet we’ve all disagreed with this at some point, and especially when it comes to diabetes. Many advocate for the importance of using non-stigmatizing, inclusive and non-judgmental language when speaking about or to people with diabetes. For some, they don’t care, others care passionately. Where do you stand when it comes to “person with diabetes” versus “diabetic”, or “checking” blood sugar versus “testing”, or any of the tons of other examples? 

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I have had Type 1 diabetes for 28 years. I am a diabetic. I am also the child of a diabetic. I’m a mother, a daughter, a wife, a blogger, a worker, a neighbor, a knitter, an exerciser. I’m also a person with children, a person with a blog, a person who goes to the gym, etc. I am a lot of things. And all of those things define me. And that’s ok.

I use “diabetic” and “person with diabetes” interchangeably. I’ll tell a physician that I’ve had diabetes for years but in the next breath I might say to someone in the waiting room “oh this is my pump, I’m a diabetic”. I wouldn’t think twice.

Ready for a curve ball? I also have Rheumatoid Arthritis and I think I would be pissed if someone referred to me as arthritic. Just typing that word bothers me. Sure my joints are arthritic but I’m not. I can’t really put my finger on why arthritic bothers me so much yet diabetic doesn’t. I have come to terms with diabetes- I have it, I’ve had it for a long time, and I’ll always have it. Sure my blood sugars can be wonky but in a weird way, I’m used to that. But things are different with RA. RA is painful, it’s debilitating. I would take diabetes over RA in a heartbeat, I wouldn’t need to think about it.

So maybe that is my issue. I have diabetes but it doesn’t have me, so the terms and language don’t bother me at all. But most days, I feel like Rheumatoid Arthritis has me. It controls me. It decides if I’m going to cry in pain on the way to work or if the ice pack strapped to my leg will be enough. And maybe, I need to come to terms with that.

Diabetes Blog Week Type 1 Diabetes

The Other Half of Diabetes

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We think a lot about the physical component of diabetes, but the mental component is just as significant. How does diabetes affect you or your loved one mentally or emotionally? How have you learned to deal with the mental aspect of the condition? Any tips, positive phrases, mantras, or ideas to share on getting out of a diabetes funk?

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Diabetes is draining. It never goes away, you can’t take a break- it’s kind of like having a toddler and trying to go to the bathroom for one second. They’re right outside the door, screaming your name. 

In addition to the carb counting, temp basals, infusion set changes, beeping pump alarms at all hours, and your pump falling out of your pants on a regular basis (that can’t just be me, right?), diabetes effects your mood. A simple dip or a climb in blood sugar, can set the tears flowing or make you want to grab a bottle of water out of a stranger’s hand. 

Diabetes is draining. So what can a girl do? Laugh. Today I told people at work that my pancreas needed a new AAA battery. I also said that eating a chocolate covered cricket was 100% not worth a bolus (and I stand by this, I will not be swayed, don’t bother trying). 

What else can you do? Share. Get on Twitter- I guarantee at any hour of the night, someone is tweeting about diabetes. Just knowing that at 2am, someone else is dealing with a blood sugar that just won’t behave, means the world. Someone gets you. They get your disease. I encourage every person with diabetes to get connected- don’t go at this alone. 

Diabetes Blog Week Type 1 Diabetes

Message Monday

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It’s the first day of Diabetes Blog Week! Woohoo! If you didn’t sign up, it’s never too late!

Let’s kick off the week by talking about why we are, in the diabetes blog space. What is the most important diabetes awareness message to you? Why is that message important for you, and what are you trying to accomplish by sharing it on your blog?

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I think sharing your story is the most important thing you can do as a patient. Why? Because each of us has a unique perspective on diabetes. There are still countless people- physicians, nurses, family members, friends still don’t understand diabetes or even know enough to help us. And even worse, there are countless incorrect myths floating out there.

My mission is simply, to put a face to diabetes. If one person wears their pump proudly, instead of hiding it, then I have accomplished my goal.