Category Archives: Type 1 Diabetes

Rheumatoid Arthritis Type 1 Diabetes

#SAVE32MIL

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The Obamacare Repeal Reconciliation Act is projected to cause 32 million Americans to lose health coverage by 2020. We need an adequate replacement, not a repeal.

This Friday, starting at 12am EST, use #SAVE32MIL on Twitter, to share your story and why healthcare is important to you. This is a non-partisan event- every American's life is important, and each person deserves quality healthcare.

Join us for a special hour Friday evening (8pm EST), where we'll discuss how to contact your legislators and what to say to them. Be prepared to share your successes and tips in advocacy!

All of this leads up to Monday, July 24th, when you'll be fully prepared to contact your legislators and encourage them to replace not repeal.

Click here to join the Facebook event and be sure to invite as many people as possible!

We are powerful as individuals, but our voices together can really make an impact. Join the conversation on Twitter, using #SAVE32MIL, as often as you can on July 21st.

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Type 1 Diabetes

Fingersticks for everyone!

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My Continous Glucose Monitor (CGM) transmitter has died. It was only meant to last a year or two and we have been together for three and a half years. Medtronic is working with my doctor and insurance to replace it. In the meantime, I’m back to fingersticks all day, like some sort of caveman.

No big deal, right? Wrong. I have become so dependent on my CGM that I truly don’t know how to comfortably live with diabetes without it.

I have diagnosed anxiety that is typically managed pretty well with medication and mindfulness. Until my CGM stopped working. I found myself feeling so panicked throughout the day. Was my blood sugar plummeting? Was it rising? Did I take enough insulin to cover lunch? Did I take too much? Continue reading

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Type 1 Diabetes

DKA

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My father was 68 years old when he passed a few days ago. He had Type One Diabetes for almost 60 years. Sixty years of urine test strips, insulin injections, fingerpricks. Sixty years of low blood sugars and high blood sugars.

This is a portion of his death certificate.

Three little letters that mean so much. D. K. A. And why was my father, a diabetic who for years had his A1C never higher than 5.8, in DKA? Because nursing homes and even hospitals don’t know anything about insulin dependent diabetes. His nursing home didn’t get his insulin from the hospital when he was transferred there. They had him wait a day to get it. A day. An entire 24 hours without insulin. And no one batted an eye. Not a doctor, not a nurse, not a medical assistant. No one.

This has to change. It has to change starting with educating the public, medical school, with each other. As diabetics we have a responsibility to explain our disease every chance we get. I owe it to my dad to try to make sure those  three little letters aren’t on another person’s death certificate.

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Family Type 1 Diabetes

Diabetes is Scary

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This photo is of me and my dad (yes, it was the 80s). My dad has had Type One diabetes my whole life.

My early memories of diabetes weren’t good, they were scary. My dad would have low blood sugars a lot and often need assistance. An ambulance had to come to our house more than once. I can remember my dad biting his tongue so bad during a low that there was blood all over his bed.

I used to have nightmares about getting diabetes. My dad used to always tell me there was a “one in a million” chance of me getting it. In 1988, I won the Diabetes Lottery.

Over the years, I have watched diabetes own my father. He had a brief stint working from home when he had passed out from a low, at a PGA tournament. The department of motor vehicles considered it to be a seizure and briefly suspended his driving license. He later decided to work from home full time. That fueled his “diabetes OCD”- the need to eat the same things at the same time every day. He planned any outing around his meals and his diabetes. He could not and would not go off schedule. Dinner was at 6:30pm every single night of my childhood.  Continue reading

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Rheumatoid Arthritis Type 1 Diabetes

Savor

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This morning I plugged a few numbers and answers into a form on JDRF.org and was presented with this:
Whoa. These numbers are estimates, they don’t include rollercoaster days and nights where I’m not sleeping and pricking my finger over and over.

They also don’t account for my life with Rheumatoid Arthritis. The injections, the blood tests, the pills, the infusions, and the time, not just sleep, that I’ve lost to pain.

They don’t account for the cost of medications and copays, the countless hours spent in doctor’s offices. And the time I spend worrying about my diseases now and what life will look like with them in future.

When I look at this, it reminds me that life is hard. Really hard. If you are in good health, savor it. Enjoy your sleep, your freedom. Appreciate your life, every minute of every day. Because, like my diagnoses of Type 1 Diabetes and Rheumatoid Arthritis, poor health can come out of nowhere.

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Rheumatoid Arthritis Type 1 Diabetes

It’s Not Pretty

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This is what I look like after:

  • Spending my commute screaming f*ck because the sciatic pain was at its worst
  • Trying to work all day with a fever
  • Being unable to get my blood sugar down because the pain is causing it to rise
  • Drinking a ridiculous amount of caffeine so I don’t fall asleep driving home later
  • Sitting on an ice pack all day because I can’t get my back to stop hurting
  • Getting ready to drive home with my sciatic nerve feeling like someone is stabbing me up and down my leg

Just living with Rheumatoid Arthritis and Type 1 Diabetes is hard enough but working full time and caring for a family is a battle a lot of patients, like me, fight every day.

I’d be disrespecting myself and my community if I only showed my “good” photos and didn’t share my struggles. So here I am. It isn’t pretty.

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Knitting Rheumatoid Arthritis Type 1 Diabetes

Self Care

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This is a sponsored post for Self Care Catalysts. I have been compensated through the Chronic Illness Bloggers network. All opinions remain my own and I was in no way influenced by the company.

When I was diagnosed with Rheumatoid Arthritis, I couldn’t stop asking “why?”. Why did this happen to me? What did I do to cause this disease? What could I have done to prevent it? The truth is, there isn’t a reason. I know that. But four years ago, I needed something tangible to tie my diagnosis to. The year right before my diagnosis, I was busy. Busy with a husband and two young children. Busy working full time in a job that required me to work early in the morning and late into the night. It required weekends and events that had me on my feet for almost 24 hours. In between meetings I would rush home to say goodbye to my daughter as she was getting on the school bus or quickly help with homework. I was exhausted but I never stopped.

I look back on the few months leading to my diagnosis and realize my body was trying, trying so hard, to tell me to slow down. I didn’t listen. Eventually, my body just stopped. I literally could not walk. It took another serious diagnosis (I already have Type 1 Diabetes) to realize that I needed to take care of myself. And that’s where self care comes in.

When I first saw the term self care, I thought it had to be a certain something. It had to be an appointment and it had to cost time and money. Like a spa day. Sure it can be a day getting pampered but that doesn’t fit into my life or budget. Continue reading

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Rheumatoid Arthritis Type 1 Diabetes

Perspective

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My first infusion was done in a small room with only two infusion chairs. Last week, was my second infusion of Simponi Aria and it was in the “main” infusion center. From what I could tell, most of the patients were fighting cancer.  

I thought to myself, “they are fighting a much harder battle than me, I’m just here for Rheumatoid Arthritis”. And then it hit me. Everyone’s battle, including mine, is important. Just because I’m injecting my small dose of chemotherapy at home and getting a biologic infusion, doesn’t mean that the infusion process is any less scary or intimidating for me. My disease will never be in remission. I have permanent damage to my joints and bones as a result of Rheumatoid Arthritis and no amount of chemotherapy is going to fix that. I could very likely be sitting in that infusion chair, every 8 weeks, for the rest of my life.

So I’m going to try to keep things in perspective. When I see someone cry or flinch while getting a flu shot, I’m going to try to remember that just because I have given myself shots for 28 years, not everyone else has. 

 

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Rheumatoid Arthritis Type 1 Diabetes

Educating the Doctor

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Today I had the privilege (?) of going to a new Endodontics practice since the root canal, that had already kept me in the dentist chair for four hours, still needed attention. 

I, of course, had the privilege of filling out new patient forms including my medication list and medical history. When I met the dentist, he reviewed what I had written (fabulous start by the way, I hate filling out forms that never get looked at). He said, and I quote:

  • “Looks like you’re in great health” Funny considering there was an actual question asking how my health was on the form. I checked poor. 
  • “Blood pressure good?” 

Yup. That’s all he asked. Thankfully my mouth wasn’t numb, so I could properly respond. “My blood pressure is fine. Just so you know, I wear an insulin pump, in case it starts beeping…” I trailed off as he again asked how my blood pressure was. Is this some sort of new dentist protocol? I know plenty of people are walking around with undiagnosed hypertension. But if you’re that concerned, take my blood pressure. Otherwise, listen to me tell you about the pancreas in my pocket. 

And then I mentioned Rheumatoid Arthritis. Why? Because it’s actually important. Most dentists want to put you on amoxicillin after dental surgery. But that antibiotic and methotrexate can be harmful. 

How about asthma? Last time I checked, breathing was still important, right?

Yes, I’m complaining. So if you’re in charge of creating forms or training new physicians, or just love complainers, listen up. I see the value in your forms. I don’t mind taking the time to fill them out. But do me a favor. Take the time to look at them and ask me about what I wrote down. I promise not to swing my purple pancreas by its infusion tubing and whack you in the head. 

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