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Rheumatoid Arthritis

The Gupta Programme

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I have been given this product as part of a product review through the Chronic Illness Bloggers network. Although the product was a gift, all opinions in this review remain my own and I was in now way influenced by the company.

The Gupta Programme is a three month program that includes a variety of materials. The program is designed for patients with ME/CFS, Fibromyalgia, and/or MCS. I can attest to how it helps with Fibromyalgia and with the pain and stress my other chronic illnesses cause me.

Overall, I found the program to be all encompassing- it allows learners of all types to get the most out of this program. The program includes the following: Continue reading

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Rheumatoid Arthritis

I’m tired.

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This morning I went to the ortho to follow-up on my shoulder and knee. My shoulder isn’t better even after an injection two weeks ago. My knee pain is some of the worst I’ve ever felt in my life. Last night it took three hydrocodone pills, ice, elevation, and plenty of tears to get my pain manageable. Earlier this week I called my new rheumatologist’s office to see if they had any cancellation spots, for the millionth time. She’s out of the office this week, so that little glimmer of hope got annihilated. I now have to fit Physical Therapy into my life to try to get my right knee strong enough to have surgery on the other knee. Continue reading

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Type 1 Diabetes

Fingersticks for everyone!

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My Continous Glucose Monitor (CGM) transmitter has died. It was only meant to last a year or two and we have been together for three and a half years. Medtronic is working with my doctor and insurance to replace it. In the meantime, I’m back to fingersticks all day, like some sort of caveman.

No big deal, right? Wrong. I have become so dependent on my CGM that I truly don’t know how to comfortably live with diabetes without it.

I have diagnosed anxiety that is typically managed pretty well with medication and mindfulness. Until my CGM stopped working. I found myself feeling so panicked throughout the day. Was my blood sugar plummeting? Was it rising? Did I take enough insulin to cover lunch? Did I take too much? Continue reading

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Rheumatoid Arthritis

I Did Something Crazy

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This weekend, I did something crazy. Instead of fighting against Rheumatoid Arthritis, I let it win. I let my body rest when I felt tired, I went out when I felt good, ate when I was hungry, and worked when I felt inspired. And I took pain meds when I was hurting.


I did a lot more resting than usual. Any other weekend, I would have gulped caffeine and pushed on. There would have been tears throughout the day- from the pain, from the exhaustion. But not this weekend.  Continue reading

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Rheumatoid Arthritis

Hands

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Since I was born, my Grandmom frequently told my mom, and later me, that I had beautiful, long, slender fingers- perfect for playing piano (I chose the trombone in middle school haha).

Fast forward quite a few years. For awhile now, my left hand has always more swollen than my right and I usually don’t think much of it. Well that’s not true. I often notice how huge my fingers are, how the veins protrude. I notice my hands all day long- while I’m driving, working, sitting on the couch.

I had my fourth infusion yesterday- this was an important one. If I don’t notice marked improvement, it’s time to move on to another biologic. I found myself checking every part of my body, looking for some sort of progress. Turning my head, bending my knee, etc. I checked my hands and noticed this: Continue reading

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Hope Rheumatoid Arthritis

Grateful Body

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I have had a Get Fit Book in my drawer for over a year. It got depressing to use because my body, especially my joints, is a constant source of disappointment.  My body doesn’t move the way I want it to, when I want it to. It’s required multiple surgeries, constant medication, and is completely unpredictable.

I pulled out my fit journal tonight and prepared to throw it away. And then I thought about it. Continue reading

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Family Hope

Regret

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You’ve heard it before “make sure you tell someone you love them, you may never see them again”. I make sure I say “goodbye” and “I love you” to my kids every morning and night. If I died tonight, they would know I loved them. Not because I said the words often. Because they felt it. They know just how important they are to me, they know that I would do anything for them.

But that’s not true with everyone in my life and I think it’s safe to assume that it’s not true for you either. Continue reading

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Hope Rheumatoid Arthritis

Validation 

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A few hours ago, I spoke with my rheumatologist about this nasty flare that I can’t seem to kick. We agreed on the cause, my father’s death recently, but we’re at a loss as to what we could actually do about it.

My pain management doctor had me do a course of steroids which, for the first time ever, made no difference. My allergies and asthma were fantastically controlled but that was it. My joints remained swollen, the pain continued to be intense, my temperature still rose, and my fatigue was just as debilitating. My rheumatologist agreed that I had taken a high enough dose where I should have felt and seen a difference.

We also agreed that it was too soon to throw in the towel Continue reading

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Rheumatoid Arthritis

Live like you’re dying

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The meaning behind “live like you’re dying” is usually to live each day to the fullest as if it will be your last day. But that’s not what I’m referring to.

This past month has been particularly rough for me. Losing my Dad at the beginning of November, set my body into a massive flare. If I’m being honest though, things haven’t been going that well for awhile now.

This is my life:

Mondays- longest, busiest day at work; when I finally get home, I put together a quick dinner for my kids and am asleep by 8.

Tuesdays- I wake up exhausted but power through my morning. Pain is bad but manageable. I try to go to the gym after work which sometimes goes well and other times, I barely make it 20 minutes. I usually have to hit the grocery store before heading home.

Continue reading

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Favorite Things Rheumatoid Arthritis

A Glowing Review for the Oska Pulse

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I have been given this product as part of a product review through the Chronic Illness Bloggers network. Although the product was a gift, all opinions in this review remain my own and I was in now way influenced by the company.

To say I was skeptical when I first saw the Oska Pulse would be an understatement. How could a little, glowing, UFO looking device, help my intense, chronic pain from Rheumatoid Arthritis? In short, it could and it did.

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For over 60 years, PEMF signals (Pulsed electromagnetic fields), similar to those in the Oska Pulse, have been used to treat pain and edema in soft tissue. It’s been established that tissues, including blood, muscle, ligaments, bone, and cartilage respond to biophysical input. Where there is better blood flow (circulation), better structure, and turnover of old structures, significant improvement is possible. The signaling processes of the Oska Pulse are wide enough to respond to the majority of pain experiences and to help the body start its natural internal recovery processes. There are multiple scientific clinical studies that demonstrate the pain relief effects from PEMF signals, click here to learn more.

In short- pain radiates from a damaged area of the body and that same area then exhibits inflammation. When PEMF is applied, your body is stimulated to repair and renovate the damaged area. Immediate relief is delivered by reducing inflammation and long term relief is delivered from the repair mechanisms your body implements while using the Oska Pulse. Continue reading

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