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Hope Rheumatoid Arthritis

Grateful Body

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I have had a Get Fit Book in my drawer for over a year. It got depressing to use because my body, especially my joints, is a constant source of disappointment.  My body doesn’t move the way I want it to, when I want it to. It’s required multiple surgeries, constant medication, and is completely unpredictable.

I pulled out my fit journal tonight and prepared to throw it away. And then I thought about it. Continue reading

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Family Hope

Regret

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You’ve heard it before “make sure you tell someone you love them, you may never see them again”. I make sure I say “goodbye” and “I love you” to my kids every morning and night. If I died tonight, they would know I loved them. Not because I said the words often. Because they felt it. They know just how important they are to me, they know that I would do anything for them.

But that’s not true with everyone in my life and I think it’s safe to assume that it’s not true for you either. Continue reading

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Hope Rheumatoid Arthritis

Validation 

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A few hours ago, I spoke with my rheumatologist about this nasty flare that I can’t seem to kick. We agreed on the cause, my father’s death recently, but we’re at a loss as to what we could actually do about it.

My pain management doctor had me do a course of steroids which, for the first time ever, made no difference. My allergies and asthma were fantastically controlled but that was it. My joints remained swollen, the pain continued to be intense, my temperature still rose, and my fatigue was just as debilitating. My rheumatologist agreed that I had taken a high enough dose where I should have felt and seen a difference.

We also agreed that it was too soon to throw in the towel Continue reading

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Rheumatoid Arthritis

Live like you’re dying

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The meaning behind “live like you’re dying” is usually to live each day to the fullest as if it will be your last day. But that’s not what I’m referring to.

This past month has been particularly rough for me. Losing my Dad at the beginning of November, set my body into a massive flare. If I’m being honest though, things haven’t been going that well for awhile now.

This is my life:

Mondays- longest, busiest day at work; when I finally get home, I put together a quick dinner for my kids and am asleep by 8.

Tuesdays- I wake up exhausted but power through my morning. Pain is bad but manageable. I try to go to the gym after work which sometimes goes well and other times, I barely make it 20 minutes. I usually have to hit the grocery store before heading home.

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Favorite Things Rheumatoid Arthritis

A Glowing Review for the Oska Pulse

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I have been given this product as part of a product review through the Chronic Illness Bloggers network. Although the product was a gift, all opinions in this review remain my own and I was in now way influenced by the company.

To say I was skeptical when I first saw the Oska Pulse would be an understatement. How could a little, glowing, UFO looking device, help my intense, chronic pain from Rheumatoid Arthritis? In short, it could and it did.

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For over 60 years, PEMF signals (Pulsed electromagnetic fields), similar to those in the Oska Pulse, have been used to treat pain and edema in soft tissue. It’s been established that tissues, including blood, muscle, ligaments, bone, and cartilage respond to biophysical input. Where there is better blood flow (circulation), better structure, and turnover of old structures, significant improvement is possible. The signaling processes of the Oska Pulse are wide enough to respond to the majority of pain experiences and to help the body start its natural internal recovery processes. There are multiple scientific clinical studies that demonstrate the pain relief effects from PEMF signals, click here to learn more.

In short- pain radiates from a damaged area of the body and that same area then exhibits inflammation. When PEMF is applied, your body is stimulated to repair and renovate the damaged area. Immediate relief is delivered by reducing inflammation and long term relief is delivered from the repair mechanisms your body implements while using the Oska Pulse. Continue reading

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Rheumatoid Arthritis

Honey Colony Superior CBD Oil

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I have been given this product as part of a product review through the Chronic Illness Bloggers network. Although the product was a gift, all opinions in this review remain my own and I was in no way influenced by the company.

First things first, what is CBD? CBD stands for Cannabidiol which is extracted from the Cannabis plant. Although CBD does not have any euphoric properties, there is the possibility for a drug test to result in a positive test for THC. Although this product contains .03% THC (federal limit is .3%) you should still use caution if you are planning to get tested. The product is legal for sale in the United States.

I’ve been using Cannabidiol products topically for the past few months- they have been very helpful in reducing my Rheumatoid Arthritis and fibromyalgia pain. I was asked to try Superior CBD Oil, made by Honey Colony, which is a custom made CBD oil that nourishes my body’s endocannabinoid system, also known as ESC. The ESC is a group of endogenous cannabinoid receptors located in the brain and the central and peripheral nervous systems. When you have a decrease in the functioning of your ESC, you can have chemical imbalances throughout your entire body. The Superior CBD Oil acts on the ESC to increase its function and promote whole body health.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Rheumatoid Arthritis

Pain Relief with Quell

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Disclosure: I have been given this product as part of a product review through the Chronic Illness Bloggers network. Although the product was a gift, all opinions in this review remain my own and I was in no way influenced by the company. 


First things first, what in the world is a Quell (aside from a really cool word!)? In short, the Quell is a 100% drug free, wearable pain relief device. It’s designed for use by patients with chronic as well as widespread pain. But how exactly does it provide relief?

  • the Quell is worn only on the upper calf where it stimulates sensory nerves
  • while wearing it, Quell taps into your body’s natural pain relief response
  • those stimulated sensory nerves carry neural pulses to your brain
  • those neural pulses trigger a natural response that blocks pain signals, leading to widespread pain relief

Sounds similar to a TENS unit, right? Here’s what sets Quell apart:

  • The technology that Quell uses, called WINS (wearable intensive nerve stimulation), is five times more powerful than traditional, over the counter TENS units
  • Quell is the only over the counter electrical nerve stimulation device that has been cleared by the FDA to be used a night. This means that you can use it twenty four hours a day, seven days a week
  • Quell’s OptiTherapy customizes and adjusts therapy so you receive optimal pain relief

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Type 1 Diabetes

DKA

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My father was 68 years old when he passed a few days ago. He had Type One Diabetes for almost 60 years. Sixty years of urine test strips, insulin injections, fingerpricks. Sixty years of low blood sugars and high blood sugars.

This is a portion of his death certificate.

Three little letters that mean so much. D. K. A. And why was my father, a diabetic who for years had his A1C never higher than 5.8, in DKA? Because nursing homes and even hospitals don’t know anything about insulin dependent diabetes. His nursing home didn’t get his insulin from the hospital when he was transferred there. They had him wait a day to get it. A day. An entire 24 hours without insulin. And no one batted an eye. Not a doctor, not a nurse, not a medical assistant. No one.

This has to change. It has to change starting with educating the public, medical school, with each other. As diabetics we have a responsibility to explain our disease every chance we get. I owe it to my dad to try to make sure those  three little letters aren’t on another person’s death certificate.

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Rheumatoid Arthritis

RA patients deserve better bandaids

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It’s 5:00am on Sunday morning. As the rest of my house soundly sleeps, I’m awake. I’m exhausted, woozy, easily confused. One look in the mirror shows that I’m as white as a ghost. I’m so nauseous, there is a diet ginger ale bottle within a foot of me.

Last night I injected methotrexate (see the gorgeous color of this chemotherapy medicine). This is the cause of most of my symptoms right now. 

In addition to all of my methotrexate hangover symptoms, I still have my “normal” RA issues. I’m in a lot of pain right now but unsure if taking pain medications would upset my stomach more than it is already. Just holding my phone to write this post is causing the fingers on my left hand to swell. Continue reading

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Family Type 1 Diabetes

Diabetes is Scary

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This photo is of me and my dad (yes, it was the 80s). My dad has had Type One diabetes my whole life.

My early memories of diabetes weren’t good, they were scary. My dad would have low blood sugars a lot and often need assistance. An ambulance had to come to our house more than once. I can remember my dad biting his tongue so bad during a low that there was blood all over his bed.

I used to have nightmares about getting diabetes. My dad used to always tell me there was a “one in a million” chance of me getting it. In 1988, I won the Diabetes Lottery.

Over the years, I have watched diabetes own my father. He had a brief stint working from home when he had passed out from a low, at a PGA tournament. The department of motor vehicles considered it to be a seizure and briefly suspended his driving license. He later decided to work from home full time. That fueled his “diabetes OCD”- the need to eat the same things at the same time every day. He planned any outing around his meals and his diabetes. He could not and would not go off schedule. Dinner was at 6:30pm every single night of my childhood.  Continue reading

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