Rheumatoid Arthritis

Progress Check

As I’m nearing the 12 week post op mark (tomorrow!), I figured it would be a good time to share how things are going.

Quick background, I had pretty intensive knee surgery back on June 1st. I took off the day of my surgery and the day after but was back to work that following Monday, from home. I’ve been teleworking full time since.

I knew this surgery was going to have one heck of a recovery. My surgeon reminded me multiple times as did friends who had the same surgery as me. But just because I knew it would be long, didn’t mean I had fully accepted it.

Crutches for months with a full leg brace to keep it fun. I’m now down to one crutch and a smaller brace. And yesterday, I went back to the office for the first time! My surgeon is only permitting me to work two days in the office for the next few weeks. I argued this when I saw him at my last visit but he was adamant- I had to work my way back to my pre surgery activities and doing too much was going to increase my already bothersome swelling and increase my healing time.

And as much as it pains me to type this, he was right. Ugh. My work day itself wasn’t rough by any means but my knee didn’t care how easy I took things or how elevated I kept my leg all day. My swelling was crazy! My ankle was huge and my kneecap couldn’t be located amongst all of my fluid. And the pain. Whoa. It hurt.

Today I saw my physical therapist and I honestly didn’t want to go to my appointment. Before I went to work, I was moving up and down stairs with an ease I hadn’t had yet. My kneecap was actually in the shape of a kneecap! Barely any swelling and pretty easily managed pain. I had myself convinced that my work day had thrown my progress back weeks. Stairs were so hard and the swelling was still there.

I didn’t realize it but today’s PT visit was progress note day. I was super bummed out when I realized. My therapist checked the strength throughout my leg, measurements for range of motion, swelling, etc. She kept saying “great” as she measured but I assumed she was just being nice (she is SO nice by the way, I love her).

She noticed the expression on my face and asked what was wrong. I told her I felt that things were so bad and really didn’t want to know how bad my report was. She then proceeded to tell me that my range of motion was back to my post op numbers, my strength was awesome (aside from the dreaded quad lag), and my swelling wasn’t measuring bad at all. Whaaaat?!

That report was the exact reminder I needed that with a chronic illness, you can’t let one bad moment, one setback, determine the future. If I let every high blood sugar, every sharp pain, ruin my day, my week, I wouldn’t have any reason to keep pushing on.

So next time you find yourself in a rough spot, pause. This will pass. And the fight alone, is something you should be proud of. It takes one hell of a person to get up every day and battle a chronic illness.

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1 comment

  1. Rick Phillips

    Always, always remember this too shall pass. And if it doesn’t, something else will come along and it will pass. So it’s only a matter of getting past.

    Hey, you will be in great shape in September in NYC.

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